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Abstract/Syllabus:

Caplice, Chris, and Yossi Sheffi, ESD.260J Logistics Systems, Fall 2006. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare), http://ocw.mit.edu (Accessed 08 Jul, 2010). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA

Logistics Systems

Fall 2006

Diagram of alternative routes overlaid on a hub-and-spoke arrangement.
The Ses #25 lecture on Transportation Management discusses various arrangements for shipping from five origins to five destinations. In this case, there are regional terminals, and the hubs can be bypassed. (Image by Prof. Yossi Sheffi.)

Course Highlights

This course features a full set of lecture notes.

Course Description

This subject is a survey of the fundamental analytic tools, approaches, and techniques which are useful in the design and operation of logistics systems and integrated supply chains. The material is taught from a managerial perspective, with an emphasis on where and how specific tools can be used to improve the overall performance and reduce the total cost of a supply chain. We place a strong emphasis on the development and use of fundamental models to illustrate the underlying concepts involved in both intra and inter-company logistics operations.

While our main objective is to develop and use models to help us analyze these situations, we will make heavy use of examples from industry to provide illustrations of the concepts in practice. This is neither a purely theoretical nor a case study course, but rather an analytical course that addresses real problems found in practice.

Technical Requirements

Special software is required to use some of the files in this course: .xls.

Syllabus

Course Description

This subject is a survey of the fundamental analytic tools, approaches, and techniques which are useful in the design and operation of logistics systems and integrated supply chains. The material is taught from a managerial perspective, with an emphasis on where and how specific tools can be used to improve the overall performance and reduce the total cost of a supply chain. We place a strong emphasis on the development and use of fundamental models to illustrate the underlying concepts involved in both intra and inter-company logistics operations.

The three main topic areas we will focus on are:

  • Demand forecasting, planning, and management,
  • Inventory planning, management, and control, and
  • Transportation planning, management, and operations.

Additionally, we will discuss:

  • Vehicle routing, scheduling, and fleet dispatching,
  • Supply chain network design,
  • Procurement, sourcing, and auctions,
  • Management and minimization of supply chain uncertainty, and
  • Supply contracts and collaboration.

While our main objective is to develop and use models to help us analyze these situations, we will make heavy use of examples from industry to provide illustrations of the concepts in practice. This is neither a purely theoretical nor a case study course, but rather an analytical course that addresses real problems found in practice.

Course Objectives

The four primary objectives of this course are:

  1. Introduce the analytic model based approach for solving logistics and supply chain problems,
  2. Reinforce the importance of using total supply chain costs in all analysis,
  3. Provide students with techniques for measuring and managing supply chain uncertainty, and
  4. Introduce the idea of using segmentation and a portfolio of solutions, rather than a single approach, for real-world logistics problems.

Prerequisites

Permission of instructors. The course also presumes a basic understanding of calculus, probability, statistics, and linear programming. Standard spreadsheet programs (such as Microsoft® Excel) will be sufficient for the required analysis.

Course Requirements and Grading Weights

  • Problem Sets: (60%) A total of 4 problem sets and 3 team assignments will be assigned throughout the semester. The problem sets focus on understanding the mechanics and fundamental concepts and are therefore individual assignments. Team projects are more extended and include real data. Each is weighted equally.
  • Final Exam: (35%) The final exam will cover the entire course and will be held on the last day of class in Ses #27. It will not be held during the final exam period. The class text book and a limited set of notes will be allowed in the Final Exam.
  • Class participation: (5%) Students are encouraged, and expected, to contribute in all class discussions - with special emphasis on their experiences with these concepts.

Required Text

 [SPP] Silver, Edward, David Pyke, and Rein Peterson. Inventory Management and Production Planning and Scheduling. 3rd ed. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, 1998. ISBN: 9780471119470.

Miscellaneous papers and manuscripts will be posted on the MIT Server and are referred to by the authors and publication date.

Optional Texts That You May Find Useful for Your Library

 [N] Nahmias, Steven. Production and Operations Analysis. 5th ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2004. ISBN: 9780071238373.

 [CM] Chopra, Sunil, and Peter Meindl. Supply Chain Management. 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2006. ISBN: 9780131730427.

 [B] Ballou, Ronald. Business Logistics Management. 5th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2003. ISBN: 9780130661845.

 [CT] Cachon, Gerard, and Christian Terwiesch. Matching Supply with Demand: An Introduction to Operations Management. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2005. ISBN: 9780072918991.

Calendar

SES # TOPICS KEY DATES
1

Course introduction and objectives

Concepts and approaches to supply chain uncertainty

 
2 Supply chain fundamentals and segmentation analysis Problem set 1 assigned
3 Demand forecasting I: Time series analysis  
4 Demand forecasting II: Causal analysis  
5 Demand forecasting III: New product forecasting

Problem set 1 due

Team assignment 1 assigned

6 Demand forecasting IV: Connections to planning and management  
7 Inventory management I: Level demand, EOQ, sensitivity Problem set 2 assigned
8 Inventory management II: EOQ extensions, discounts, exchange curves, etc. Team assignment 1 due
9 Inventory management III: Time-varying demand (fixed horizon)  
10 Review of probability and statistics using Excel and textbook

Problem set 2 due

Problem set 3 assigned

11 Inventory management IV: Probabilistic demand, safety stock  
12 Inventory management V: Backorder costs, implied costs, extensions, A and C items  
13 Problem solving session: Probabilistic demand  
14 Inventory management VI: Special products — fashion, style, and perishable goods

Problem set 3 due

Team assignment 2 assigned

15 Inventory management VII: MRP and DRP systems  
16 Inventory management VIII: Inventory management and optimization in practice  
17 Supply chain network design  
18 Supply chain contracts Team assignment 2 due
19 Auctions in supply chain management Problem set 4 assigned
20 Transportation I: Fundamental concepts, strategic networks, connection to inventory planning Team assignment 3 assigned
21 Transportation II: Operational network analysis  
22 Transportation III: Routing and scheduling approaches and algorithms  
23 Transportation IV: Shipper perspective — strategies and approaches for design and management Problem set 4 due
24 Transportation V: Procurement and use of combinatorial auctions  
25 Transportation VI: Carrier operations and yield management Team assignment 3 due
26

Risk pooling strategies and approaches

Putting it all together — what really happens in practice?

 
27 Final exam  



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